July 14, 1886: British and Germans demarcate eastern boarder of the Gold Coast

From the time of the first European contact with Portuguese traders in 1478, different regions of modern day Ghana have been dominated by Ashanti, British, Dagomba, Danish, Dutch, Ewe, German, Portuguese, and Swedish groups along with people native to Ghana controlling smaller portions (Akyem, Fante, Ga, etc.).

British (left) and French Togoland. The land to the west of the green-highlighted territory was granted to the Gold Coast by the treaty. After the dissolution of German Togoland, the Gold Coast absorbed the green territory.

British (left) and French Togoland. The land to the west of the green-highlighted territory was granted to the Gold Coast by the treaty. After the dissolution of German Togoland, the Gold Coast absorbed the green territory.

By the conclusion of the 19th century, the British consolidated most of the land we know as Ghana to be the British Gold Coast. On July 14, 1886 a border for the Easternmost section of the country was agreed upon between the Germans and British to separate the Gold Coast from Togoland. The agreement stipulated that Togoland would contain the territories of Towe, Kowe, and Agotime while the Gold Coast would retain Aquamoo and Peki. North of Peki, the Volta River was agreed to function as the border. In future decades, all of these territories would be absorbed into the Gold Coast.